Why Recycled Content Matters [Infographic]

Sustainability is a hot topic across nearly every industry, but print and paper might be one of the biggest. But when it comes to sustainable printing solutions, are brands looking much beyond the label? Do they know what attributes are important? Do they view sustainable paper as a dual opportunity to benefit their brand and the environment?

Unfortunately for many brands, choosing paper is often an afterthought. However, when you select a truly sustainable paper—one that goes beyond basic environmental certifications—you turn an afterthought into a brand asset.

So how do you know which papers are best for the environment? Look for the paper made from the most recycled materials possible. 

Check out the infographic below to see how much recycled content matters.

Infographic: Why Recycled Content Matters

Consumers Value Recycled Paper

It’s a common myth that paper made from post-consumer recycled fibers (PCRF) should only be used in tissue, low-grade packaging, and other “down-cycled” stocks. But in reality, PCRF doesn’t compromise quality for printing or writing papers.

When properly equipped, recycling facilities and paper manufacturers are able to meet the same standards for brightness. Plus, printing and writing papers do not require the fiber strength or purity of virgin fiber, as some packaging and other paper products do. More importantly, the number of consumers who value PCRF content in their printing and writing paper is large and growing.

They want it, and there’s no reason not to give it to them.

This infographic first appeared in Tactics Magazine, Volume 8, Issue 5.

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Tags: Tactics Magazine, Sustainability, FSC

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Tactics Magazine

This article first appeared in Tactics, our bi-monthly industry publication created by and for marketing and creative minds. Each issue provides informative articles, expert advice, and thought-provoking strategies designed to engage marketers from all industries.

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